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Artificial intelligence can outsmart Captcha
Computer scientists have developed artificial intelligence that can outsmart the Captcha websit...

NEW SIG – Information and Cyber Security
NEW SIG – Information and Cyber Security

Large scale object recognition
Deep learning has been achieved in large scale object recognition with CNNs

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Artificial intelligence has become mainstream

Google stopped its Home Mini speakers
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Features

A window on the world of O.R.?
The “invisibility cloak” of science fiction is now fact, albeit with limitations. O.R. could claim to have had the power of invisibility for years, though not by desire; what we want is the opposite - a high-visibility jacket! Indeed, part of the mission of the OR Society is to help make our presence more visible. But perception involves both the observed and the observer. And all of us have open and hidden parts.

YOR18 – OR – A Twenty Twenty Vision
The 18th Young [to] OR Conference got off to a great start with the plenary session given by the President of the OR Society, Dr Geoff Royston. Antuela Tako, the chair of the organising committee, began the proceedings by telling the audience what had been planned for them and how to find out more about streams.

The Education & Research Committee
- Roles and Responsibilities: Brian Dangerfield (Liaison with ESRC)
Ruth Kaufman, Inside OR February 2013

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Posted on 20 September 2013

Technology

Is Google's Chromecast the future of television?

Netflix and YouTube are also websites, but there's a technical distinction explained later. Chromecast is fast, easy to set up, and pretty much foolproof to use. And it's £30, which makes it one of the best values in tech ever. It's expected to hit shops in the UK before Christmas.

Chromecast is simpler, faster and more intuitive than the alternatives. Other methods usually require four or five steps to set up streaming. First, you've got to turn on the TV, choose the right input, turn on the ancillary device, load up an app, find a show, and then press play. It takes a minute or two, and if your set-top box is really slow, maybe a lot more.

Chromecast eliminates a couple of those steps, and it makes others much faster. In this way, Chromecast is similar to other small digital set-top boxes, especially the Roku (from £49.99) and the £99 Apple TV. With Chromecast, you turn on the TV. Then you load up Netflix (or YouTube or Chrome) on any other machine that's handy- it could be a PC, a phone, or a tablet, or whatever you have lying around. It's much faster to navigate and type on those devices than on your set-top box, so you'll find your show much more quickly. Then press play. On many TVs, you won't even need to change your TV's input -Chromecast will do that for you. Once you find your show, press play. Like black magic, your video just shows up on your TV.

The device streams videos in two ways - either directly over the internet from a service like Netflix, or from the Chrome browser on your own computer. The first of these methods is the better one - because the video is coming directly from Netflix, your phone or PC is acting only as the remote, and you can turn it off after you've started watching the video. The downside is that, at the moment, only YouTube, Netflix, and Google Play support this direct streaming method.