Sign Out
Logged In:
 
 
 
 
 
Tab Image

Latest News

Research Excellence Framework 2021
Research Excellence Framework 2021 Panel Membership Announced

Impartiality in AI and Machine Learning
The Global Future Councils held in Dubai in 2017 discussed the effect of large-scale adoption o...

Women in Mathematics
Only 4% of mathematics professors in the UK are female

Humans are not fooled
Humans are not fooled when they get called by software bots that can convincingly mimic the hum...

The musical mood of the nation
Examine the musical mood of the nation when contemplating changes to the Bank’s interest rate

More

Tab Image

Features

A window on the world of O.R.?
The “invisibility cloak” of science fiction is now fact, albeit with limitations. O.R. could claim to have had the power of invisibility for years, though not by desire; what we want is the opposite - a high-visibility jacket! Indeed, part of the mission of the OR Society is to help make our presence more visible. But perception involves both the observed and the observer. And all of us have open and hidden parts.

YOR18 – OR – A Twenty Twenty Vision
The 18th Young [to] OR Conference got off to a great start with the plenary session given by the President of the OR Society, Dr Geoff Royston. Antuela Tako, the chair of the organising committee, began the proceedings by telling the audience what had been planned for them and how to find out more about streams.

The Education & Research Committee
- Roles and Responsibilities: Brian Dangerfield (Liaison with ESRC)
Ruth Kaufman, Inside OR February 2013

Tab Image

Posted on 26 October 2013

Education

Science grades drop the biggest

There was a big fall in pupils getting top grades in all the sciences, following the introduction of new syllabuses and exams.

There has been a drop in the proportion of GCSE exam entries awarded top grades, for the second year in a row. This year 53.1% of science entries were awarded between an A* and a C, down from 60.7% last year. That drop - of 7.6 percentage points - was the biggest fall in top results across all the subjects. Smaller falls were seen in the separate sciences and in additional science too.

The results also show an increase in those taking foreign languages and humanities at GCSE level. Entries for geography jumped by 19.2% this year, while those for history rose 16.7%. Entries for traditional modern foreign languages - French, German and Spanish - are up by 16.9% compared with last year, reversing a long-term downward trend.

This trend is likely to be linked to the introduction in the autumn of 2010 of a new league table measure, known as the English Baccalaureate, which now rates schools on how many pupils get good GCSEs in such subjects, as well as sciences and English and maths.