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JORS: Volume 68, Issue 11
JORS: Volume 68, Issue 11, November 2017

REF 2021
Most of the important decisions have already been taken regarding the next Research Excellence ...

Universities "mis-selling" courses
Universities could be accused of "mis-selling" courses to teenagers

Artificial intelligence program has triumphed at chess
Google's AlphaGo Zero artificial intelligence program has triumphed at chess

Degrees in two years
Students in England are going to be offered degrees in two years

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Features

A window on the world of O.R.?
The “invisibility cloak” of science fiction is now fact, albeit with limitations. O.R. could claim to have had the power of invisibility for years, though not by desire; what we want is the opposite - a high-visibility jacket! Indeed, part of the mission of the OR Society is to help make our presence more visible. But perception involves both the observed and the observer. And all of us have open and hidden parts.

YOR18 – OR – A Twenty Twenty Vision
The 18th Young [to] OR Conference got off to a great start with the plenary session given by the President of the OR Society, Dr Geoff Royston. Antuela Tako, the chair of the organising committee, began the proceedings by telling the audience what had been planned for them and how to find out more about streams.

The Education & Research Committee
- Roles and Responsibilities: Brian Dangerfield (Liaison with ESRC)
Ruth Kaufman, Inside OR February 2013

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Posted on 28 December 2017

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence program has triumphed at chess

Google says its AlphaGo Zero artificial intelligence program has triumphed at chess against world-leading specialist software within hours of teaching itself the game from scratch.
The firm's DeepMind division says that it played 100 games against Stockfish 8, and won or drew all of them.
The research has yet to be peer reviewed.
But experts already suggest the achievement will strengthen the firm's position in a competitive sector.
"From a scientific point of view, it's the latest in a series of dazzling results that DeepMind has produced," the University of Oxford's Prof Michael Wooldridge told the BBC.
"The general trajectory in DeepMind seems to be to solve a problem and then demonstrate it can really ramp up performance, and that's very impressive."
Image copyrightGETTY IMAGESImage captionDeepMind has previously won a series of Go games against some of the world's top human players
DeepMind has previously defeated several of the world's top human players of the Chinese board game Go, as well as teaching itself how to play video games including Pong and Space Invaders.
The London-based team is currently trying to develop a system that can beat humans at the space strategy game Starcraft, which is seen as being an even more complex challenge.