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Conference / Events

OR56 Annual Conference

Royal Holloway University of London, Egham.
9 – 11 September 2014

EURO2015
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
12 (welcome), 13 – 15 July 2015

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Past Meetings

Annual General Meeting

Venue: Blackett Room, University of Strathclyde
Date: Monday, 18 November 2013 at 16:00

Blackett Room (GH863), Graham Hills Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1QE

We invite you all to attend a general meeting of ORGS (OR Group of Scotland) to discuss the following items:

  • Election of the ORGS committee (Chair, Secretary, Treasurer, and Members-at-Large).
  • Insights from current committee members & transfer of posts.
  • Discussion of current and future developments and events.

If you confirm your attendance by noon, 11th Novemebr, by email to roberto.rossi@ed.ac.uk, we will be able to circulate any last minute developments to you, and that will also help us with planning.

If you would like to serve in any particular role in the committee, please indicate your interest by noon, 11th November, to roberto.rossi@ed.ac.uk, so that can be circulated to attending members.

 


RSS Glasgow Group and ORGS meeting on Expert Judgement

Venue: University of Strathclyde, Livingstone Tower 908
Speaker: Dr John Paul Gosling and Professor Tim Bedford
Date: Monday, 14 October 2013 at 16:00

Dr John Paul Gosling, University of Leeds – Helping Defra estimate the cost of animal disease

 Since the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak of 2001, there has been debate about the sharing, between government and industry, of both the costs of livestock disease outbreaks and responsibility for the decisions that give rise to them. As part of a consultation into the formation of a new body to manage livestock diseases, government veterinarians and economists produced estimates of the average annual costs for a number of exotic infectious diseases. Alongside these estimates was the following caveat: “It is important to emphasize that these figures are not intended to be forecasts or predictions of what will happen or what Defra considers is likely to happen”. Such statements are difficult for the decision maker to interpret, and a colleague and I were asked to help quantify this apparent uncertainty.

In this talk, I will describe how government experts were helped to quantify their uncertainties about the cost estimates using formal expert elicitation techniques and how we dealt with uncertainties that were deemed unquantifiable. This case study in expert elicitation highlights the difficulties of applying formal elicitation methods when the facilitators are placed under tight time constraints.

 

Professor Tim Bedford, University of Strathclyde – Using Expert Data in Uncertainty Modelling –Theory, Methodology and Practice

Expert Data is often a necessary adjunct to, or alternative for, statistical data, in many settings of uncertainty modelling. In this talk we give a necessarily brief overview of some of the broad issues that arise in theory methodology, and practice. Theory exists particularly in the psychology and mathematics literatures, taking quite different underlying perspectives such as “why do people assess things as they do?” and “how do we develop an optimal rule to combine expert evidence?”. Methodology ideally tries to bring together these different perspectives to provide processes that minimize psychological biases in individual experts and use mathematically rigorous methods to optimally combine data from different experts. Practice provides operationally different contexts for expert data which may lay quite strong boundary conditions on the applicable methods and theory.


Two Talks from Professor Tone

Venue: University of Edinburgh Business School, 29 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh
Speaker: Professor Emeritus Kaoru Tone, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan
Date: Wednesday, 26 June 2013 at 14:00 - 17:00

We are glad to announce that Professor Tone will present two talks, as detailed below.

Dynamic DEA with network structure: A slacks-based measure approach

We propose a dynamic DEA model involving network structure in each period within the framework of a slacks-based measure approach. We have previously published the network SBM (NSBM) and the dynamic SBM (DSBM) models separately. Hence, this article is a composite of these two models. Vertically, we deal with multiple divisions connected by links of network structure within each period and, horizontally, we combine the network structure by means of carry-over activities between two succeeding periods. This model can evaluate (1) the overall efficiency over the entire observed period, (2) dynamic change of period efficiency and (3) dynamic change of divisional efficiency. The model can be implemented in input-, output- or non-(both) oriented forms under the CRS or VRS assumptions on the production possibility set. Finally, we applied this model to a dataset of US electric utilities and compared the result with that of DSBM.

A scale and cluster adjusted DEA model that permits both convex and non-convex efficient frontiers

In DEA we are often puzzled by the big difference in CRS and VRS scores, and by the convexity production set syndrome in spite of the S-shaped curve often observed in many real data. In this paper we perform a challenge to these subjects. At the first step, we evaluate CRS and VRS scores for all DMUs by means of some techniques, e.g. by the conventional methods. We obtain the scale-efficiency for each DMU, e.g. CRS/VRS. Using the scale-efficiency, we decompose the CRS slacks into scale-independent and scale-dependent parts for each DMU. At the second step, we eliminate scale-dependent slacks from the data set and thus obtain a scale-independent data set. At the third step, we classify DMUs into several clusters depending on the degree of scale-efficiency or on some predetermined characteristics. We evaluate slacks of scale-independent DMUs within the same cluster by the CRS model and obtain in-cluster slacks. Adding scale-dependent and in-cluster slacks, we define the total slacks for each DMU. And at the fourth step, we evaluate the efficiency score of DMU by means of the total slacks via the SBM model and project the DMU onto the efficient frontiers which are no more guaranteed to be convex and usually are non-convex. Lastly, we define the scale-dependent data set by which we can find the scale elasticity of each DMU. We apply this model to a data set of Japanese universities.

Event organized by University of Edinburgh Business School and sponsored by OR Group of Scotland.


Workshop on Optimization of Distribution Operations and Routing & Scheduling Decisions in Freight Logistics.

Venue: Lecture Theatre 4 - Business School, 29 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh
Speaker: Various
Date: Monday, 03 June 2013 at 08:00 - 04 June 2013 - 19:00

Dates

3rd Jun 2013 08:00 - 4th Jun 2013 19:00

Duration

1 day and 11 hours

Venue

Lecture Theatre 4 - Business School, 29 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh

Speakers

Professor Jens Lysgaard - Aarhus University, Denmark, Dr Tolga Bektas - University of Southampton, UK, Dr Jamal Ouenniche - University of Edinburgh, Professor Kevin Glazebrook - Lancaster University, UK

Contact

Susan Keatinge susan.keatinge@ed.ac.uk


Mixed Integer Programming for the Inventory-Routing Problem

Venue: Graham Hills Building, Room GH813, 40 George Street, Glasgow G1 1QE
Speaker: Haldun Süral, Industrial Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara
Date: Thursday, 07 March 2013 at 16:00 - 17:30

Abstract

The inventory-routing problem jointly decides on inventory management issues and when and in what sequence to visit the customers in a supply chain. The aim is to minimize the system-wide inventory holding and routing costs of the supply chain. We consider several mixed integer program formulations of the problem and discuss computational advantages and disadvantages of these formulations. A branch-and-cut approach and a heuristic based on an a priori tour are presented to solve the problem. We provide our computational results about the branch-and-cut algorithm and the heuristic that perform better than their competitors in the literature.

Biographical Sketch

Haldun Süral is a faculty member at the IE Department of Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey. He received his BS, MS, and PhD all from METU. His work experience includes teaching and research positions at METU, INSEAD (Fontainebleau, France), and University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier University (Waterloo, Canada). His applied research works range from beer forecasting and supply network design to restructuring a large humanitarian aid organization and waste management system design. He is a member of the advisory board of OR Spectrum and he served at the editorial board of Turkish Journal of Industrial Engineering. He is past president of the OR Society of Turkey. His research interests include methodology, modeling, and applications in OR/IE and history of OR/IE in Turkey.


OR Group in Scotland Annual General Meeting

Venue: 'Blackett Room' (GH863), Graham Hills Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1QE
Date: Wednesday, 31 October 2012 at 15:00
To operate efficiently as a regional society, I invite you all to attend a general meeting of ORGS (OR Group of Scotland) to discuss the following items:

  • Election of the ORGS committee (Chair, Secretary, Treasurer, and Members-at-Large).
  • Insights from current committee members & transfer of posts.
  • Discussion of how ORGS should operate.
Meeting details can be found above. If you confirm your attendance by noon, 26th October, by email to kerem.akartunali@strath.ac.uk, we will be able to circulate any last minute developments to you, and that will also help us with planning.

If you would like to serve in any particular role in the committee, please indicate your interest by noon, 26th October, to kerem.akartunali@strath.ac.uk, so that can be circulated to attending members.

Thanks for your interest, and looking forward to seeing you in Glasgow in few weeks.

Dr. Kerem Akartunali