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Past Meetings

OR applied in decision support for strategic maintenance planning in the offshore wind industry

Venue: Room 4D05, D Building, UWE Frenchay campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Speaker: Xiaodong Li, University of the West of England
Date: Monday, 10 July 2017 at 17:00

Tea and coffee will be available from 17.00 with the talk due to start at 17.30.

The talk introduces a Decision Support System (DSS), which is developed for maintenance cost optimisation at an Offshore Wind Farm (OWF). The DSS is designed for use by multiple stakeholders in the OWF sector with the overall goal of informing maintenance strategy and reducing lifecycle maintenance costs at the OWF. Both deterministic and stochastic optimisation models underpin the DSS. The deterministic version is intended for use by stakeholders with access to accurate failure rate data; and the stochastic model is intended for use by stakeholders who have less certainty about failure rates. At present, the mathematical model of the DSS is extended by considering more uncertain parameters, such as wind speed and its correlation with failure frequency. A wind speed dependent failure rate is adapted into an extended model. Weibull distribution and Markov process are proposed to predict the weather parameters. The updated DSS will be able to provide more accurate outcome results and hence to give more efficient support for strategic maintenance planning in OWF. In basis of the same algorithm, a web-based DSS to estimate OWF maintenance cost is under construction.


Joint SWORDS/WORDS Event - Diversity and identity: challenges and opportunities for UK OR

Venue: Cardiff School of Mathematics
Speaker: Ruth Kaufman, President of the OR Society
TBC
Meeting Details
The next meeting is a joint one with SWORDS and is scheduled for Tuesday the 7th of February 2017. The meeting will be held at the School of Mathematics, Cardiff University.There will be cheese and wine available from 5.15pm in room M/1.04 on the first floor in the School of Mathematics. The talk will commence at 6.00pm in room E/0.15 (ground floor). Please note that times and rooms are different to normal.
Abstract 
People engaged in an activity like O.R., can be described on countless dimensions. For example, personal characteristics (the 'protected characteristics' of ethnicity, gender etc. that are part of formal diversity initiatives, but also values, preferences, personality), daily work activities, customer,  owner, career path,  whether they have ever heard of O.R.  Diversity can be a strength; but so can uniform identity. This talk reviews some significant dimensions of diversity and identity in UK OR, to consider what we might need to do to overcome the challenges of too much or too little diversity, and where we can exploit the enormous potential benefits of the glorious variety of ways of 'being an O.R. person'.

 


Joint SWORDS/WORDS Event - Diversity and identity: challenges and opportunities for UK OR

Venue: Cardiff School of Mathematics
Speaker: Ruth Kaufman
Date: Tuesday, 07 February 2017 at 17:15 - 19:00

This joint meeting will take place on Tuesday the 7th of February 2017. The meeting will be held at the School of Mathematics, Cardiff University. There will be cheese and wine available from 5.15pm in room M/1.04 on the first floor in the School of Mathematics. The talk will commence at 6.00pm in room E/0.15 (ground floor). Please note that times and rooms are different to normal.


 Abstract
People engaged in an activity like O.R., can be described on countless dimensions. For example, personal characteristics (the 'protected characteristics' of ethnicity, gender etc. that are part of formal diversity initiatives, but also values, preferences, personality), daily work activities, customer,  owner, career path,  whether they have ever heard of O.R.  Diversity can be a strength; but so can uniform identity. This talk reviews some significant dimensions of diversity and identity in UK OR, to consider what we might need to do to overcome the challenges of too much or too little diversity, and where we can exploit the enormous potential benefits of the glorious variety of ways of 'being an O.R. person'.


Disaster preparedness in humanitarian logistics: A collaborative approach for resource management in floods

Venue: Room 4D05, D Building, UWE Frenchay campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Speaker: Oscar Rodriguez Espindola
Date: Wednesday, 09 March 2016 at 17:45

Disaster preparedness in humanitarian logistics: A collaborative approach for resource management in floods

Venue: Room 4D05, D Building, UWE Frenchay campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY

Attendees can park here: https://goo.gl/maps/eQT2nD3sQ7x after entering the North entrance to UWE on the ring road: https://goo.gl/maps/6zCmHZDaHG42

Speaker: Oscar Rodriguez Espindola
Date: Wednesday, 9 March 2016 at 17:45

Tea and coffee will be available from 17.00 with the talk due to start at 17.45. For planning purposes, please let Ken McNaught (K.R.McNaught@cranfield.ac.uk) or Alistair Clark (Alistair.Clark@uwe.ac.uk) know if you intend to come.

Abstract:
The logistical deployment of resources to provide relief to victims of disasters and the appropriate planning and management of these activities are critical to reduce the suffering caused. Humanitarian logistics represents one of the most important fields during preparedness and response in cases of disaster, seeking to provide relief, information and services to disaster victims. On top of the challenges posed by logistical activities, disaster management commonly attracts many actors working alongside each other and sharing resources to cope with the emergency. Handling the resources of these actors is a complex task due to the variety of actors and resources available. This is particularly important for developing countries, where disasters occur very often and resources are even scarcer. Despite this, there is little research considering multiple organisations, and none concerning the optimisation of the number of actors required to avoid shortages or convergence. 
The aim of this research is to develop a system for disaster preparedness based on a combination of multi-objective optimisation and geographical information systems to aid multi-organisational decision-making. A cartographic model is used to avoid the selection of floodable facilities, and a bi-objective optimisation model is used to determine the location of emergency facilities, stock prepositioning, resource allocation and relief distribution, along with the number of actors required to perform these activities.
The system was applied to a case study in Mexico involving several relief organisations. The formulation proposed showed the capacity to optimise the decisions and the number of organisations required for logistical activities. 


Intelligent Designs: Systems approaches to understand policy rationales and objectives at national and local levels

Venue: Room 4D05, D Building, UWE Frenchay campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Speaker: Ian Mitchell FORS (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills)
Date: Tuesday, 22 September 2015 at 17:00 - 19:00

Tea and coffee will be available from 17.00 with the talk due to start at 17.45. This will be followed by a brief AGM. For planning purposes, please let Ken Mcnaught (k.r.mcnaught@cranfield.ac.uk) or Alistair Clark (Alistair.Clark@uwe.ac.uk) know if you intend to come.

 

This talk will describe the use of techniques including Systems Thinking and Multi Criteria Decision Analysis to structure understanding of situations and potential interventions.


Use of a Model for Setting an Achievable Public Health Target: The Case of Childhood Obesity in the UK

Venue: Room 3Q43, Q Building, UWE Frenchay campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Speaker: Brian Dangerfield, Department of Management, University of Bristol
Date: Wednesday, 25 February 2015 at 18:00

Tea and coffee will be available from 17.30 with the talk due to start at 18.00. For planning purposes, please let Ken Mcnaught (k.r.mcnaught@cranfield.ac.uk) or Alistair Clark (Alistair.Clark@uwe.ac.uk) know if you intend to come.

Abstract

Amongst the global threats to health facing the advanced economies, obesity is rapidly becoming a prime focus. This is because, in large measure, it is a condition which is a precursor for a range of more serious diseases, including diabetes and hypertension. Interest in a particular condition often results in governments and public health bodies setting targets aimed at reducing the prevalence of that condition in the general population. However, it appears that public health targets are not set by any informed background analysis but rather by what seems reasonable and is tolerable in political terms. In the UK in 2008 the then government announced that it would be striving, by 2020, to bring the obesity metrics back to those prevailing in 2000. Based upon a population-level model addressing the development of overweight and obesity in children (2-15 years), we demonstrate that the achievement of this target (in children) is highly unlikely. The model, which combines knowledge from nutrition, physical activity and body metabolism, shows that a plausible target date would be 2026 at least. Acknowledgement of the delays involved in reversing obesity trends is vital in setting sensible targets in this domain of public health. In general, models have an important role to play in the formulation of achievable public health targets.