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Welcome to the People Analytics Special Interest Group pages on which we’ll be posting comments, information, news of our events and activities, reports of meetings and other interesting features.

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Recent Blog Posts


Thursday, 2 Aug 2018
Amy Hughes

Operational Research Society: People Analytics Special Interest Group Minutes

Date: 17th April 2018

Minutes:

  • Introduction of committee members – Jill Millicamp; Katie Gronow; Zoe Gordon; Tommy Fennelly
  • Requests for input on future topics / techniques for talks and / or webinars
  • Requests for any volunteers for new committee members to help organise future events as committee is at the minimum quorum

1.    Time to Hire and Recruitment Diversity Reports

Speaker: Konrad Wyszogrodzki (Ministry of Justice)

  • Outlined objectives in terms of increasing diversity and reducing time to hire – and how to measure both
  • Described important data fields such as timestamps etc.
  • Software used was SAS (to create csv outputs) and Tableau (as a presentation layer)

Time to Hire

  • Demo of reporting dashboard (using dummy data) with key metrics for time to hire as well as the various filters that can be applied to the data to enable comparison
  • Demo continued onto look at the breakdown of each stage in the recruitment process and the time between steps. This was presented over many months to enable comparison and can be split by business group.
  • Demo also showed the distribution of how long it took to hire and how this has changed over time
  • Findings: has identified issues in the recruitment process and has resulted in changes to pre-employment checks

Recruitment Outcomes & Diversity

  • Analysis of where individuals fail in the process and those reaching each stage of the process
  • Outlined the drivers behind the Inclusion & Diversity strategy with data being a key component to enable targeted action and measurement of results
  • Demo data was again used to demonstrate the analysis undertaken
  • Diversity analysis includes looking “vertically” at those that were in that stage and any biases in this set and why; and horizontally to look at how candidates progress through the stages
  • Subsequent analysis focused on the seniority of the role and the diversity of the applicants
  •  Highlights biases / potential problems affecting applicants at various stages
  • Next steps are to look at socio-economic background / social mobility; reasons for drop-out (voluntary or failing?) and significance testing of differences

2.    Forecasting the Age of the DWP’s future workforce

Speaker: Shane Kennedy (Department for Work and Pensions)

  • There is generally an ageing population in the UK with this trend set to continue in future
  • There has been analysis done across the civil service to understand the age groups employed though not every department is the same
  • The larger government departments are generally getting older driving the general increase in the age profile of the civil service
  • To enable rapid development of age profile forecast a number of assumptions were made
  • DWP is a demonstrably ageing department
  •  Age is seen as a driver of leaving – with the leaving rate changing as people age
  • The model developed is effectively a stock-flow model
  • The changes in state pension age in 2010 for women has driven different behaviours and as the state pension age will continue to change in the future this will need to be accounted for
  • The model consequently treats retirements as a separate factor than “other leavers”
  • The known current gaps in the analysis are:
    • No gender split / considerations on behaviour
    • Range on retirement was not changed
  • A number of different recruitment scenarios can be modelled including hire-freezes; no recruitment etc.
  • As a result the analysis produces a ranged age distribution
  • Some of the key findings / additional considerations highlighted in the analysis were:
    • Workforce will continue to age even with optimised recruitment at younger ages
    • Retaining people may reduce knowledge loss but does impact on promotions for other staff
    • People tend to move to part-time work prior to retirement which overall could drive down FTE but increase head-count
    • Differences are observed across grades in terms of age composition and retirement ages
  • Overall there are a number of risks with the assumptions made
  • There was some additional discussion amongst the attendees as to additional considerations / developments for the model:
    • Understanding key jobs / roles / volumes at certain grade
    • Sickness / absenteeism and variation across different groups
    •  Geographic breakdown
    • Time-in post / grade
    • HMRC have a model that estimates likelihood of resigning, retiring etc. – there could be useful knowledge sharing with this

3.    Equality and diversity in the legal profession: Using administrative data to understand intersectional penalties and privileges

Speaker: Dr. Danat Valizade (Leeds University)

  • Research project on whether there are penalties and privileges in relation to career progression for specific gender and ethnic backgrounds in the legal profession
  • Solicitors Regulation Authority hold current and historic records for 200,000 practising lawyers dating back to 1930 as well as holding aggregate firm-level data spanning 2014 – 2016
  • Approach is to use intersectionality (i.e. looking across both ethnicity and gender as opposed to looking at each in isolation) and understand the impact of the two factors
  • Profession has become more diverse over time – with more white females now entering the profession than white males
  • The legal profession is highly stratified with many different firms; locations etc. being more prestigious
  • Different gender and ethnic groups work at different types of firms
  • Statistical analysis of individual law firms to group firms into different characteristics as to how diverse / unequal the firm make-up is. This results in 5 different groupings which can be roughly ordered in terms of prestige.
  • Regression analysis undertaken to determine how likely an individual is to progress to partner for the legal profession as a whole and then repeated the analysis for each of the 5 different identified types of law firms
  • Females suffer a significant penalty to progress to partner as there is for ethnicity across the profession
  • There is mixed effects across different ethnic groups and gender across the different types of firms
  • White males have the largest probability of making it to partner; high-street firms provide BAME solicitors with the greatest opportunity to progress to partner
  • Future research will consider the dynamic social network effects that tie solicitors together (e.g. working at the same firm at the same time)
  • Immediate effect of the study is that more data will be collected (e.g. socio-economic background)

4.    People Analytics: The state of the field

Speaker: Andy Charlwood (Leeds University)

  • Example shared regarding how difficult it has been to get engagement and data from local NHS to undertake any analysis
  • The purpose of this study was to understand who was doing what and why they were doing it over the course of a series of 21 qualitative interviews
  • Diverse group of people from diverse organisations have been interviewed
  • There are many different titles for this area – this is defined under the umbrella of People Analytics
  • Consultancies have perpetuated the ‘journey to maturity’ message – this is generally misleading in how People Analytics actually develops in an organisation
  • A different idea to talk about different types of HR analytics capabilities including: labour intensive basic reporting; automated advanced reporting; advanced BI: basic people insight; advanced people insight. Generally, the link to strategy increases across these categories
  • Even in advanced organisations with a data driven culture it can still be difficult to embed the key metrics and analysis into decision making processes
  • Characteristics of organisations that are good at people analytics have:
    • Data driven business models
    • Predominantly professional workforces – expensive and highly skilled
    • Regulatory requirements for extensive reporting
  • Some of the issues in the field are:
    • The business impact of the analytics products
    • Getting permission to do more advanced analytics
    • Obtaining non-HR data and problems
    • Articulating the value of analytics (ROI etc.)
  • Some of the reasons why organisations aren’t doing more:
    • Lack of appetite for evidence based management e.g. algorithm aversion, action bias, confirmation bias
    • Difficulties in accessing non-HR data
    • Ethics, privacy, legal compliance
    • Lack of consultancy skills to act as a data translator
  • Doing effective people analytics is less about technical skills and more about understanding the problem and communication skills. Other key points are:
    • Need to work fast
    • Relationships are critical
    • Good communication and influencing skills

Throughout the session, attendees were asked to place post-it notes on the wall indicating the talks that they would like to see. The responses are below:

  • Workforce Planning (Demo / Models / Supply Models)
  • Dealing with limited success on planning
  • How can OR & Analytics support or create strategy in the People / HR area
  • Analysis approaches for performance measurement of HR function
  • Analysis approaches for evaluating the effectiveness of performance management / appraisal systems
  • Analysis of key skills / job families
  • Measuring impact and effectiveness of training and learning
  • Target social researchers if they want to join the group as some do relevant work
  • Hot topics focus / discussion (e.g. people performance)
  • Regular technical webinar (perhaps monthly): such as new techniques, useful techniques, general knowledge sharing
  • Longitudinal analysis
  • Networking opportunities
  • CCSL / SOP
  • Data Issues
  • Sub-group / network


Thursday, 19 Jul 2018
Katie Gronow

The next People Analytics SIG meeting will be held on Tuesday 25th September from 1pm in London, including talks and our annual committee meeting.

More details will follow, plus a link for booking a place, but in the meantime pease hold the date and time in yor diary.



Monday, 12 Mar 2018
Katie Gronow

OR Society People Analytics Special Interest Group

Terms of Reference

Area of Interest

  1. 1.    ‘People Analytics’ is a rapidly growing discipline of interest to businesses. With access to more data and new visualisation and analytical tools a wide range of companies are beginning to apply mathematical, statistical, data mining and other O.R. techniques to HR and business data to try and understand and resolve HR related business problems:
    1. Workforce Modelling
    2. Diversity and Inclusion
    3. People Surveys
    4. Talent Management
    5. Paybill Modelling
    6. Performance Management
    7. Estates Modelling

Aim of the Group

  1. To share knowledge and best practise and promote more widely the use of OR techniques in the area of HR decision making.
  2. To explore new thinking and techniques applicable to HR
  3. To explore some of the challenges faced in using HR data and working with HR professionals.

Membership

  1. The group is open to anyone, although committee members have to be members of the OR Society.

Meetings

  1. A General meeting will be held annually to:
    1. to approve the minutes of the previous General Meeting.
    2. to receive reports from the Chair and Secretary.
    3. to elect a committee for the forthcoming year.

Events

  1. There will be 3 events organised each year. Plan for the 18/19:

 

Spring: Face to Face Event in London with guest speakers from Leeds Uni

Summer: Webinar (Topic tbc)

Autumn: General Meeting

 

Reporting

  1. The Secretary shall make speakers’ notes or presentation material from a SIG meeting, if appropriate and not subject to copyright, and the full write-up of the SIG meeting, available in the OR Society’s document repository.

 

 

Current Committee

Chair: Jill Millichamp (DWP) –Call, officiate and conduct meetings

Secretary: Tommy Fennelly (IBM) – minutes the meeting, keeps membership up to date, Updates Future meetings page of OR Society

Event Communications: Katie Gronow (DfT) – advertises events and writes report for HR Society

Event Planning: Zoe Gordon (MoJ) – organises room/Video Conference/speakers

27/02/2018



‘People Analytics’ is a rapidly growing discipline of interest to businesses. With access to more data and new visualisation and analytical tools a wide range of companies are beginning to apply mathematical, statistical, data mining and other O.R. techniques to HR and business data to try and understand and resolve HR related business problems, such as:

 

    • Workforce Modelling
    • Diversity and Inclusion
    • People Surveys
    • Talent Management
    • Paybill Modelling
    • Performance Management
    • Estates Modelling

The aim of this group:

 

  1. To share knowledge and best practise and promote more widely the use of OR techniques in the area of HR decision making.
  2. To explore new thinking and techniques applicable to HR
  3. To explore some of the challenges faced in using HR data and working with HR professionals.

Membership:

The group is open to anyone and you do not need to work in operational research to join. 

 

To find out more, see our terms of reference (http://www.theorsociety.com/Blog/people-analytics/20180312133646.aspx